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Remember, these are snapshots
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NOT commercial work.

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Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? This wasn't a shipwreck, it was just a small iceberg. When we were low on fresh water, we occasionally pulled up to these and hoisted hunks aboard. The melted runoff was used for drinking water and the ice was used to keep fish cold. Iceberg water sucks BTW. It stinks. I can barely tolerate it. I think it has to do with the millions-of-years-old organic material (i.e. bugs, pollens, bacteria and God knows what else -- maybe even dinosaur poop) that has been trapped in the ice all that time, and then, when thawed, it sort of rots in the open air. I hate iceberg water. And I was never convinced it was particularly healthy. But when thirsty, you drink what you have. A curious thing, which makes one appreciate the Titanic disaster all the more: Icebergs seem like they are as hard as diamonds. Whenever we pulled up to an iceberg we were insanely careful not to let any part of the hull even gently touch any part of the berg because it would cause the hull to kind of ring like a bell. You could bump a dock, or a log, or even a rock with the hull, and you'd experience a bump or a knock. But with icebergs, they caused a sound that was somewhat unholy and quite disturbing. Wood hulls are not so prone to this. I can't imagine the other-worldly sounds the Titanic must have made when hitting that big one solidly and at speed. It must have been terrifying.

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? A plane crash. Grisly mess. I normally closed my eyes when I had to look for bodies. I just felt for body parts and tried not to see much.

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Big yacht saw two buoys and went between them at top speed. Typical yachtsman. I have no positive things to say about yachtsmen. Not one. After 321 rescues I have NO POSITIVE THINGS TO SAY ABOUT YACHTSMEN. We even rescued the United States Coast Guard twice. No positive things to say. I wish I did. Eventually we came to see the Coast Guard as just glorified yachtsmen and absolutely nothing more. Don't get me started.

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Seaplane stupidly sunk. Really good story but I won't tell it.

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Looking down the down-line at 225 feet

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Working on a wreck at 225

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Two barges lost in a storm, beached and holed. Pumping to re float

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? 225 on straight air. Let there be dragons lol

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Trying to read the ship's name to be sure I had the right one. Depth 225

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Strange experience. We were towing two capsized vessel, one astern of the other, about 600 feet astern of our tug. A nuke sub was southbound and we were northbound. We passed starboard to starboard at a distance of about six miles. We were making way at about 2 knots and the sub was doing its usual 14 or whatever, creating an absolutely lethal wake for any small craft -- as usual. Like the Honey Badger of YouTube fame, the US Navy "don't give a fu--". Suddenly they executed a hard 90 degree starboard turn and in minutes closed the distance to us. Headed straight at us we tried every frequency but they would never answer. When very close to us they executed another hard 90 degree turn to their starboard and came up about 20 meters from us, direcdtly abeam (not shown in this shot). Suddenly the heavy steel conning tower hatch slammed open and three "frogmen" with automatic weapons scurried out as quickly as squirrels and put us nearly at gunpoint. Still no radio contact. Presently the skipper climbed up through the hatch in a very leisurely manner and lazily saluted his crew and then turned to face us, snapping pictures on a cheap camera. Two or three more armed crewmen came up to stand alongside the captain. We waved. They glared. They dogged us like this for maybe half an hour. The vessel traffic service also refused to acknowledge or answer us. Then the sub slowly veered away, as shown in this photo, and eventually resumed their original course. Honestly, we didn't get a single picture when they were next to us because we didn't want any cameras to be mistaken for weapons. Very austere group of people. And curiously more, the sub never requested any course change through the vessel traffic system, at least not on any frequency that we were privy to monitor. Just one of those odd experiences you often have at sea.

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Small commercial boat being raised

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Ancient sailboat being re-floated due to negligence

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Sunken vessel just breaking the surface after being floated up from the bottom



Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? No, of course you don't

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? A tug and derrick arrangement we used often

 


Ah, the technology of point-and-shoot cameras of the 1970's. Don'tcha miss it? Heading down to 225 feet (actually 245 at the work deck at the stern of the wreck). The man in the red suit was my Navy Master Diver (not to be even remotely confused with the sporty, recreational SCUBA label of "Dive Master"). He was one of nine men used to create the original decompression tables that all divers use today. It was trial and error in those days. Send 'em down, jerk 'em back up. Oh, they're bent? Ok, treat and send 'em down again with a modified exposure. This man kept us alive on these deep dives by extrapolating the known decompression table curves into very unknown territories. We were doing long, boring hours of decom, but no one ever bent, and we always did the job. Diving gasses were around in those days but nothing like they are today.

 

 

 

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SQUID GAMES!
With MyMateNate!
i
n Jomtien, Chonburi, Thailand!
December, 2021

 

 

 

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